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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
industry. i was just wondering if you would talk a little bit about the environment and environmental issues. here in this country whenever we talk about new exploration, we're also talking about environmental implications, and we hear about disasters here. we don't really hear much about them in russian -- russia, though i'm sure they exist and can be quite massive. so i wondered if you'd just talk about that a bit. >> well, here we come to the guilty part of the guilty love. because i'm as conscious as everyone else that we are, in a sense, too clever for our own good. by the way, one of the unfortunate consequences of this bonanza that we are, that we have just, that we are now harvesting is that we are headed in all likelihood for an era of quite possibly cheaper hydrocarbons, and certainly very abundant hydrocarbons. that thing which is so easy for us which is to climb this our car and head to the nearest gas station is something that's going to get easier and easier and easier for the next generation. and this is very bad news for the environment, there's no question about that.
the challenges of the uncertainty they will be facing as soldiers in a counterterrorism environment. it shows this environment they are facing is not precise and orally. the leader they have to be is empfide by the stampede and the circumstances are frequently confusing. the rain is blowing sideways, there is dark and ominous clouds and seems like it's gretting barely brighter as he goes forward. some of the parts of the organization are way ahead and some may or may not catch up. and you have a lightning bolt that is going off that you have to confront. well on behalf of the people up at west point, i want to tell you it's been our pleasure and honor to be able to teach the cadets that are there that are understanding more and more of what they have to confront with regard to terrorism and terrorists and they are up to that task. last summer my son happened to be graduating with the class of 2012. the class of 2012 picked for their class motto for more than ourselves. i think that that reflects the generation of young men and young women that are coming to the military academy at west point
business. the combination of policies that are not hostile to business and an environment which actually welcomes new businesses and new jobs is working. it is clear. in a competitive world, policies matter. companies have choices. job-creators have choices. that is why our work is far from done. that is why a top priority must be to continue new jersey's record of excellence in education and to fix problems where we are failing. in higher education, the task force led with skill by former governor tom kean has helped us develop strategies for making new jersey's institutions more competitive. we need to turn new jersey's universities -- including rutgers -- from good to great, because that will help us keep more talented new jersey students in new jersey and will strengthen the link between higher education and high quality jobs. at the heart of these reforms we need, of course, is the plan to make sure that new jersey's critically important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in th
an interesting expression. she said, i grew up in an environment that was christian in which people followed their christian religion, others followed their muslim religion, and others their african superstitions. for me, this went to the heart of why the book was inevitable, or why, for me, i was engaged this this discourse all my life. it's very strange. i found it very interesting today, close to 80, i should actually exist in an environment in which for admitting what i believe or for believing what i do not believe to be considered of what i call terminal censorship. now, go back to the history, and i don't mean just me personally. i'm talking about the society in which i live, in which i was raised, the history of my people as i now write in the book, when the european explorers, of course, always quickly followed by religious storm troopers, the missionaries came to africa on the mission of conversion, they had a very serious problem, and that was they could not find satan. they couldn't find the denver. now, if you want to convert people, you have to persuade them that they -- that t
is republicaning off through the subdivision much faster. it's a dynamic environment and we're not arming people with the information and we're not arming people with the facts that they need to be purchasing flood insurance. >> and the other problem we have particularly with respect to insurance is not just flood insurance. we've had homeowners all across the region fighting with their insurance companies right now and we're finding people with insurance and who think they have the coverage to protect their home, forget about the flood insurance, in jn, wind damage or hurricane damage or content are finding that they either don't have -- their insurance company the not responding to them. that's a conic problem. most people are underinsured. it's an industry on people betting against themselves. you hope you never need it and the insurance companieses are not in the business of paying out claims and their goal is to keep the money you gave them. they don't want to pay it out and we're finding that people think they have a particular level of coverage but when you delve into their insurance poli
enough people. and how do we get them in an environment in which nobody wants to serve and we have a hard time making national security decisions about what to do and make them honestly and intelligently. we've had a pretty lousy record of making intelligent decisions about national security in the last few years. >> i just think it's fascinating that we're now in a position where we need to be transitioning from being a military that is making all of its decisions about dwell time and how much time you got between deployments and who is going to deploy where and when to instead thinking about a mill they're is not at war, that needs to decide what its strength is going to be, its training requirements, its weapons systems are going to be. and the last time we did this really is after vietnam and we've got all these vietnam guys. >> you're absolutely right. if you talk to a guy like marty dempsey, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, and you get him against the corner and we're inside the cone of silence and he'll tell you honestly what he believes, he will tell you that one of the majo
, these are women who have either come out of this environment, out of an urban center in particular. we have our own struggles in the rural parts of america. we need to bring these things to the discussion. that is what we need to do. i do not think we will find solutions to the questions that the caller had until we get those people living with the struggles of the table. that means more women, more african-americans, more hispanics, more men and women of color. i feel strongly that we need more women in this discussion. we're still sitting at 20% of congress. we have a long way to go. host: caller in richmond, democrats line. caller: i was wondering how we will ever get equal pay when states like virginia have the right to work law and they can fire you for any reason. and the company i work for, if you discuss what you make to another employee, you can get fired. guest: it is about laws. laws are made by elected officials. who is representing us at the state legislature and in congress matters. we can overturn right to work laws. and we can pass it will pay laws. we need the right people to s
.s.s., perhaps should be funded by the space operations budget. we're in a challenging budget environment. fiscal realities demand that nasa become more efficient. consensus has to be established among agency stakeholders, and also to clarify nasa's strategic vision, goals, and mission. the good work that nasa has done and that nasa can do in the future is so very important to me, and to everyone here in this room. i want to preserve our international space station. it is not likely with this electorate than we can expect to go to mars until people can go to the grocery store. it is about the economy. the economy has to improve. i want to work together to insure the american people can get the kind of results that nasa is capable of producing. we have a distinguished panel of witnesses today. this should spark much-needed national dialogue about nasa's future. the group is uniquely qualified to start this important discussion by sharing their own perspective about the strategic direction of america's space program. that concludes my remarks. i now recognize mrs. johnson for her opening statement.
and do little for the environment. in seattle, dan springer, fox news. >>> i'm shanea and this is the fox report. the fiscal cliff is now history but another brewing battle in the nation's capitol looms on the horizon. this time raising the country's $16.4 trillion spending limb. we hit that number earlier this week and the treasury department says if no deal can be reached to raise the limit in the next two months our nation will know longer be able to pay its bills. the battle lines appear already drawn. republicans say reducing spending is the only way to cut into the nation's bloated deficit. president obama in the meantime says he will not compromise over his calls to congress to raise the debt ceiling without negotiations. senior affairs, white house correspondent starts with this. the president has warned congress several times not to tie the debt ceiling talks to spending cuts. is he persuading any republicans? >> doesn't look like it, shannon, because they are shaping up for another fight in a matter of weeks. technically the government ran out of money the end of the year. secre
the kids before they become violent and help create the positive environments in schools. >> legal la mcdowell, the advancement project. great to have you on this morning. >>> coming up, the power of prayer. the atlanta pastor that was picked by president obama to deliver a benediction at the obama inauguration. coming under fire for a sermon that he gave in the '90s which may have given him a disinvite. >> did you look at his signature? >> not that i'm aware of. >> that is jack lew, the president's nominee for treasury secretary. what we know about him besides that weird looking signature? >>> and does president obama need a binderful of women or is that overblown? tweet me @thomasroberts. when what you just bought, just broke. or when you have a little trouble a long way from home... as an american express cardmember you can expect some help. but what you might not expect, is you can get all this with a prepaid card. spends like cash. feels like membership. that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so co
to their environment, office furniture, software needed -- which nevwhenever thy to support the core for environment. at that time i was hired with the company. i was working seven days a week nonstop as all over corporations were installing $15 million systems like you would go out and buy a pack of gum. i think taxation against large corporations is what is part of our problem in this country right now. i believe if we would give them an incentive to be able to do that got onhighere and penalizing them for being successful, i think we would have a lot better environment economically. basically this all ties to the tax deductions that everyone is looking at, and i heard rumblings of a simple tax. well, we're not in a position right now to offer that. it sounds like a great idea, but something that would have to evolve over time. my point i am trying to make on the obama care thing, and i did not mention that, but i feel it they had a corporate tax, not a loophole, but basically a did nation tax, corporations could do a fund that would support a medical plan and the country, we would not have the co
. it costs a lot of money. in this case it is also costing the environment. >>steve: thanks for the cheery report. >> i was at the redskins game so i'm in a bad news. i'm hosting varney together. we're going to have grover norquist. we're going to give him a heart time because i say this fiscal cliff might have been his waterloo. >>steve: in a couple of minutes, the former marine who wrote a scathing letter to dianne feinstein will join us live. >>gretchen: matt damon wants us to believe that fracking is bad in his movie but a secret report says no fracking way. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could a luminous protein in jellyfish, impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment informati
a proper environment in which to do their jobs and that will include making sure that don't ask, don't tell and elimination of don't ask, don't tell is fully implemented. >> with regard to the military budget, he has called the military a bloated organization. chairman of the joint chiefs, martin dempsey, said this week that we are on the brink of creating a hollow force. would a secretary of defense hagel pro-provide over the hollowing out of the defense department? >> the biggest concern with respect to who will league out is this sequester that's hanging like a sword over the department. that's what they had tried -- have to not let that happen but with respect to going in and finding things within the department of defense that perhaps you don't need or you can eliminate, if that's what you mean by bloat, i hope he does find bloat and gets rid of it. >> agree with his characterization that it's bloated? >> bloated doesn't necessarily mean the whole department is bloated. bloated mean there is are probably things in the department that you can take a hard look at and determine whether or
. there are changes in votes year to year and the environment changes, the discussion goes further. i think there will be some developments over the next few years in regards to these two guys and sosa included but is it enough to bump them up another 40% wii is what they need 0 get into the hall. >> i'm curious in the last 30-seconds, you said the writers look at other cry i can't, the brirs and the strikeouts and those are things like character. is that something well defined in baseball and in sports? >> well, you know, that rule was written a long time ago. so ty cobb who is a notorious womanizer is easily in the hall of fame. what defines character has evolved over time. this has defined the discussion and other areas and hall of fame don't have that in their procedure. >> barry sverluga thank you very much. >> thank you for having me. >> ifill: again, the major developments of the day: a major new study found one in eight american teenagers has had suicidal thoughts and one of every 25 has attempted suicide. there was word that president obama will nominate his chief of staff, jack le
, they act like steroids in our environment, and they amplify everything, and they make heat waves more intense, they make the drought that still grips 61% of this country, makes it more intense. that drought that we saw last year, we're dealing with this year, the low levels in the mississippi river, that's going to go into next year. part of the problem is we're not having enough precipitation come down, not enough snowfall and rain to help alleviate that drought. >> what about the ice melt and effects of -- i know you've been to greenland and all over the globe, really, to witness the effects on animal life and ultimately on our own weather systems. >> it affects everything. they are seeing the ice melt in greenland faster than they ever anticipated. it is happening much faster than scientists ever expected, and that's one of the many alarming things. the other thing about having warmer weather, while you and i enjoy it because we don't have to put on heavy boots, scarves, gloves, all of that, it changes our ability to grow things. we are seeing growing zones in the united states mig
will be assisting in conducting those elections. of course where afghanistan will have the right environment for conducting elections without interference, and without undue concern in that regard for the afghan people. we also discussed in a bit of a detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral agreement that we have between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already in the effort that we called for the strategic partnership agreement between afghanistan and the united states view it as a good relationship and a valued one. so by that context the bilateral agreement is one that the afghan people approve and we will conduct it in detail where both the interests of the united states and the interests of afghan will be kept in mind. we had a number of other issues also to talk about. during our conversations and perhaps many times in the conversation beginning with the conversation, of course, i thanked the president for the help that the united states has given to the afghan people for all that we have gained in th
street environment it focused on more short-term results. more than a year after his death, steve johnsbs was still at the top. at number two, amazon's jeff bezos, share holders of the online retailer have seen a return of more than 12,000% since 1996. in third place, the leader of samsung. he's turned the maker of large screen tvs and cell phones into a dominant worldwide player in consumer electronics. including in the top 100, notables like current hewlett-packard's ceo meg whitman. the owner of the nba's nets and former google ceo eric schmidt. and the biggest leap for a ceo from harvard's last ranking in 2010 was made by lars sorensen who leads the pharmaceutical manufacturer. he jumped all the way from number 233 to number 20. >> and joining us now is susan battery, an expert on leadership and career experts. she's a ceo herr of battley consultants. good morning. >> do you think they got it right? i think they got it right on one aspect which is shareholder value over time. while this is critical in terms of what investors are looking at, i do believe
? >> about $135. and you go online and cut out the middleman. it's an a wholesale environment. that might be $250 above. people really respond to that and everybody can appreciate a value. >> a good story. a couple buddies making good. >> 200%. >> congratulations on ledbury and on your baby, more important. >>> coming up next, the president on the council of foreign relations. richard haass of the romney campaign, dan senore, much to talk about. also, mayor michael bloomberg of new york city and mika's dad, dr. brzezinski. >> well done, willie. with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your
there is cognitive behavioral therapy. mind physicalness. sleep environment. make sure you take an hour before you go to sleep at night to wind down. make sure the environment is dark and cool. 65 to 75-degrees is best. >> a cooler room? >> cooler room. i write something down in a journal? what's that do? >> you can't solve the problems of the day in the middle of the night. write it down. you will forget what you're up thinking about at night. write it down. reach out to a friend or sleep specialist. >> doctor are you are a sleep specialist have you ever taken a sleeping pill. >> no, i never have. >> what's your technique? >> mike, unfortunately all of us, you included we have some demands and expectations, irregular schedules but it's like diet. sometimes you go out and you are with colleagues and you will eat that cheese cake. you don't do testify single day. you follow these simple rules. the journal and keeping a regular schedule is so important. it really is is. >> is scotch in there anywhere? no? >> some people are using it but with the ambien it would be a problem. >> don't do that? >> don't
because of the -- of an environment that says, anything goes. so there's a reason for regulations. not just to stifle business. the police we see on their corneres are an example of regulation. that same idea goes up and beyond that. the financial things as well. >> host: ken in atlanta, georgia. you're on the air. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen, this is just a treat. just a real pleasure to hear you and i've got some good news for you. right now, on youtube, there's a seven and a half minute film narrated by former president of georgia tech, incidentally georgia tech won the ball game the other day -- but georgia tech's president, the name of this film is, all american citizen team. and it is an effort that the georgia general assembly has been involved in since the 1970s, and we found out that there is a problem and it takes us back to a country western song, looking for love in all the wrong places. >> guest: one of our favorites. >> caller: we don't have problem with the government and we don't have a problem with elected officials. the problem turns out to be the folks
to sort of build a better environment for consumers, dr. sachs, where is the consumer today on being treated fairly by the banks, being given clear information, being not put in situations where they're going to go under water like still so many americans are with their mortgages? >> well, i think we're all confused. >> have any of them improved? >> i think there's probably a little improvement. i think elizabeth war knoren is going to make a big difference because she's going to be watching absolutely. i think the truth is the bankers still run the show in washington as well as on wall street. the thing about bailing out banks, even if you had to bail out the financial system, you don't have to bail out the bankers. and that's where they didn't know how to draw the line. and i think what you said, joe, is absolutely right. the campaign contributions have been the focus on both parties. this time they went wildly for the republican side because it's true. you do the slightest thing, it's indignation. you only gave us hundreds of billions of dollars of bailout. how dare you say a word
., their compensation structure is too high in the current environment. just like everything else in life, the price of stuff goes down, the price of banking services, we know we're trading stocks now for three or four bucks online. the pay structure has completely evolved to the point where these banks are realizing, it's not sustainable. and they're getting smaller. and i know there's -- listen, not a lot of sympathy out there for wall street or the pay or whatever. but these are also men and women losing their jobs. and i'll tell you what is risky is new york city, guys. don't forget that right now one in every five tax dollars for new york city comes from the financial services community. so while there will be -- listen, a lot of people will be like, well, they've been overpaid for years, whatever. the point is, this could take a hit on new york city, it's not like you're going to eliminate a banker's job and replace that with another job that makes a couple hundred thousand a year. so watch new york city. i'm sure they're not real happy about this, as well. the banks are simply too big, guys.
or attempts on his life three times and operates in a very difficult political environment and has an insurgency going. so i think if you put all of those factors in play, suddenly you get a better measure of the kind of what he has facing him. i'm not saying that president karzai is a perfect leader. but what i'm saying is we should try to understand that context and i think it can allow us to deal better with a leader like him? >> in your book you write this about the afghan president. hamid karzai was a man of strong emotions and loyalties rubbed raw sometimes to cynicism by long years and slowed to trust but chited to relationships. you spent a lot of travel time with him. bottom line, is he doing what he needs to do? >> well, i'm not on the ground to junl the current activities but i think he's doing what he thinks he has to do, and that is navigate a western coalition that is very skeptical of the mission and desirous of pulling out, dealing with a taliban insurgency and then internal politics. so i think if you really look at his challenge, he's walking a tight rope in a sti
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)